Roast Beef with Garlic Mushroom Stuffing

Happy Sunday, everybody

A Man and I are going on holiday next week (hooray!!!) and so made quite a specific shopping list before buying food yesterday to make sure we didn’t have loads left in the fridge.  We decided we’d have a roast today, and I could make soup tomorrow, my intention being to make stock from the bones.  Somehow we came back with a boneless rump of beef.  Not quite sure how, but never mind!

You won’t get a beautiful, easy-to-carve joint after stuffing it like this unless you’re a wizard at butchers’ knots and have a much longer joint that we did (ours was a tiny 2-ounce piece, but that suits us fine) but you should get one that’s lovely and moist and flavoursome.  The advantage we did have by having a little joint was that it doesn’t take long to cook, and you can chuck your potatoes in with the meat right at the beginning.  I forgot to take a photo until half-way through the meal, so close your eyes and visualise roast beef and stuffing.

The stuffing would be lovely as part of a vegetarian meal (obviously without the parma ham and lamb dripping!) stuffed in peppers or courgettes.  Yum yum yum!

Love love

Gemma xx

Roast Beef with Garlic Mushroom Stuffing

Top Rump Joint
1 onion, diced
Closed cup mushrooms, diced
2 fat cloves garlic, crushed
Fresh Thyme
2 rashers bacon or parma ham, diced
Breadcrumbs, made from 2 slices of bread
2 eggs, beaten
Fresh black pepper
2 onions, sliced in half
Potatoes
Swede
Small carrots
Sugarsnap peas
Yorkshire pudding batter
1 beef stock cube
1 dessertspoon tomato purée
Plain flour

  1. Fry the onion, mushrooms and garlic on a low heat until soft.  I used lamb dripping from the crispy lamb the other day, but any fat would be fine.
  2. Stir through the bacon, thyme and breadcrumbs and season to taste.  You probably won’t need much salt because of the bacon.
  3. Remove the stuffing from the heat and stir through the eggs until it forms a kind of soft dough.
  4. If your meat is wrapped around with string or elastic, remove it (mine had an elastic net around it, which I kept whole to put back around the meat after stuffing).  Make a cut along the grain of the meat to around 2 thirds of the way through.  Make another cut at rights angles to the first to around 2 thirds of the way through.  Repeat this as many times as possible and open out the meat into a single long strip.  Spread stuffing over the inside of the meat, then roll up again.  Tie string around the joint, or re-wrap with elastic to keep it in shape.
  5. Preheat the oven as hot as it will go.  Place the onion halves on a roasting tin, with the meat on top.  If the joint is very lean, spread some fat over the top (again, I used lamb dripping).
  6. Take a pan of cold water and set on a medium-high heat.  Add the potatoes and swede to par-boil (I never bother to peel my roasties any more, but you can if you like).  Once the water has come to the boil, leave it on the heat for 4 minutes.  Drain the veg (keep hold of the water for gravy later on) and place in the roasting tin around the joint.  Put it in the oven for 15 minutes at the high temperature, then turn it down to 190OC/375OF/Gas mark 5 for 15 minutes per pound for rare meat.  Add another 15 minutes to the total cooking time for medium, or half an hour for well done meat.  Baste the meat and veg a couple of times throughout cooking.  Don’t be scared to take it out early if it looks ready – meat cooks at different speeds not only based on its weight, but its shape too.  It’ll keep warm out of the oven under tin foil.
  7. If your carrots are nice and young, you don’t need to worry about peeling them.  Simply boil them whole for 10-15 minutes, or until al dente.  I cooked them until nearly done immediately after par-boiling the potatoes and swede (in the same water), then removed and cooled them.  I then steamed them with the sugarsnaps to heat them through around 5 minutes before serving.
  8. Once your meat is cooked, remove from the oven and cover with tin foil to rest for 15 – 20 minutes.  This way, it will be more tender when served.  Transfer your roasted veg into a serving dish and replace in the oven to keep warm.
  9. Heat a little fat from the roasting tin in a yorkshire pudding tray until sizzling, then add your batter.  Cook until puffed up (around 20 minutes).
  10. Pour out all except 2 tablespoons of the fat from the roasting tray, leaving the meat juices and the onion halves.  Mix the stock cube and tomato purée with the veg water.
  11. Place the roasting tin on a medium hob.  Squash the onions down and add some flour a tablespoon at a time, stirring well until the fat has been absorbed.  Gradually add the beef stock a little at a time, stirring well after each until you have a gravy of the desired volume and thickness.  You can add a little red wine to the gravy if desired.
  12. Carve the beef as thinly as possible and serve with the stuffing, roast and steamed veg, yorkshire puddings and lots of gravy.

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2 thoughts on “Roast Beef with Garlic Mushroom Stuffing

  1. Lynn Agresti March 11, 2012 at 11:05 pm Reply

    Loving the information on this website , you have done outstanding job on the blog posts.

  2. clumsylawyer April 29, 2012 at 1:42 pm Reply

    Reblogged this on recipeforprocrastination and commented:

    I tried Roast Beef and Garlic Mushroom Stuffing again today, with a couple of key changes. The joint was a piece of boneless rib of beef, roasted for only around 45 minutes before being taken out to rest. The stuffing was simply put in an oven-proof dish and baked by itself for around half an hour. All served up with roast potatoes, yorkshire pudding, runner beans and leftover marrow and cauliflower cheese. Pudding to follow later on…

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